Sew Along – Purse (post 3)

Have you started your purse? If so, please share below in the comments or in the FB group.

My Progress:

After I reached the 1.5″ diameter, I switched to a double crochet. I did three rows of the double crochet, then started adding beads to every other double crochet. At first, I tried to slide the bead onto the thread over. I did a few stitches of that. Then, un-did them. Then, I tried to add the bead during the final pull through of the double crochet. I decided that was a complete pain. I un-did those stitches. Then, I want back to putting the beads on during the thread over. It was the easier of the two methods.

Four episodes of an odd super-hero show later, I had two, almost three, rows of beading done (plus the preceding two unbeaded rows.) There is some wonkiness in the full light of the camera flash. I should have put a measure in there. That is about 2″ wide.2016-02-28-20.00.22.jpg.jpeg2016-02-28-20.00.43.jpg.jpeg

I do have one small problem. I am using 30 beads per row. Below are all the beads I have left. I am going to have to buy more.

Additionally, I do not want to cut the thread to add more beads. Nope, nope. Not at all. Originally, I just wanted to bead the blue area. Now, I’m thinking, I’ll be beading the white stripe as that is the only way I can think to add more beads without unspooling the whole blue spool or cutting the thread. 2016-02-28-20.01.25.jpg.jpeg

Lessons learned:

  • More than 4 grams of cut steel beads are needed. I now estimate more like 8 for a minimal beading, 12 for a simple striping. Much more for a design.
  • I am finding it very tempting to do a pattern with the beads.
Published in: on March 13, 2016 at 9:37 am  Comments (2)  

Sew Along – Purse (post 2)

Have you selected your purse? If so, please share below in the comments or in the FB group.

I selected a simple crochet long purse (aka ‘miser’ purse) that I am working in the round rather than lengthwise in rows.

Here is some of the progress I have made:

I pre-threaded the silver beads onto the blue silk thread. I figure I’ll thread the gold ones from the other end. (I hope that works)

I started with a loop with ten crochets chained on. (sorry about my less than correct crochet terms.)

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I worked around and around in single crochet, increasing between each stitch. (In this case, I increase by stitching a single crochet, a chain, then a single crochet, a chain, etc. rather than what seems to technically be an increase where I would work two single crochets in a single loop. The loops simple were not big enough to to to that and that isn’t how I learned to do it as a kid. Habits are hard to break.)2016-02-07-19.44.17.jpg.jpeg

The first night I made it to the inside of my circle. These were all single crochet. Then I switched to a half-double crochet through the outside of the circle (1.5″.)2016-02-07-20.49.33.jpg.jpeg

It seems I either failed to get a photo of the 1.5″ diameter or accidentally deleted it.

 

Lessons learned:

  • More light is needed for working with the blue silk, especially with the very bottom when the single crochet stitches are so tight.
  • My single crochet and half crochet stitches are very tight. This is bad for the sanity. Good for keeping coins in. This can lead to funkiness.
Published in: on March 6, 2016 at 6:00 am  Comments (3)  

SEW ALONG – Purse

Welcome to my second open Sew Along of the year. For this sew along we are each making a purse in a style and era of our choosing.

For the sake of this Sew Along, we are defining a purse as that which holds money. I am pulling this definition from the miser purse dissertation I shared weeks back.

Purse Ideas:

I have a board started with various purse ideas. In general, you will notice purses were small items, smaller than ‘bags’. Here is just a sampling:

Top R-L- Coin purse ca 1799-1820, Pence Jug ca 1830-60, miser style purse 1800-20, Bottom R-L – long purse 18th century, Christmas purse from Peterson’s, String purse 1880s. (I am really tempted to do that first one too…. and a jug)

A museum full of purses and bags (European.)

**If you want an original miser style purse to copy, I’ve saved a few to an Etsy Treasury. There is a wide range of eras in the Treasury. All are under $100 though.**

Resources:

Knots Indeed has given those who are interested in knitting, netting or crocheting a purse a jump start with this page filled with links to directions.

The blog, With My Needle’s Eye, shares eye candy from Amsterdam’s Purse Museum.

There are several period books with netting, knit, and crochet projects that can be found on Google Books, Archive.org and Hathi Trust. Here is a sampling:

My Purse Project:

I am crocheting a blue and cream silk miser style purse. (Something like the simpler side of this example, without the incredible designs on the right.) My materials include 200 yards of blue silk thread in size E, vintage cream silk I have in size D, teeny silver and gold steel beads (btw 4oz is about a tablespoon. I may need more.), and a pair of steel rings.

I am sticking with a simple purse, crochet round rather than flat as it seem so many of the directions indicate. This is so I can get the hang of this and because I do not read crochet directions well, okay, at all. I’m aiming for 9 inches in length as that seems to be a common recommendation for ladies purses in the 40s and 50s. I want to do one end silver and one end gold. I still haven’t found an image to tell me which end should be which though.

I thought I would be sewing the beads on after, which made a pattern like this 2016-02-02-08.13.33.jpg.jpegappealing. It turns out, the beads are strung on first. Look at the method below. I fear my beads may be too tiny my thread. I’m not even sure I have a needle small enough just now for them. We shall see.

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My Materials (If you want to make what I am making):

 

Other Materials you might like:

I would love, love these original rings Vintage Victorian metal sliders for an Antique Misers Purse, vintage steel cut bead supplies, antique metal sliders, steampunk supplies. Okay, I am really tempted to buy them. But, this is becoming a pricey little purse.

I find these and these 6mm Ring Blank - Stainless Steel Ring, Ring for Stamping - Blank Ring - Stainless Steel Stamping Ring Comfort Fit Ring Decorated Edge (116) to be potential wider modern options.

 

Logistics:

We currently have two Facebook groups going, the larger Sew Along group and the small, closed, local group. I was going to go with just the one group. But, I’ve now decided to keep both open because I think it is important to have both co-support groups going.

 

 

Published in: on March 1, 2016 at 6:00 am  Comments (2)  
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Sew Along – Work Bag (week6)

This week we are finishing our work bag by decorating with ruched ribbon, adding the ribbon handles and the wool needle pages for the cotton bag and adding a handle & draw for the silk bag.

Cotton Work Bag

To cut your wool needle pages, take the template from week 1 and trace this on a piece of paper. Trim the piece of paper down along the curved sides to the size and shape you like. Be sure to leave enough of the flat side for the fold to be a solid anchor. I trimmed about a half inch in from the edge for mine. This becomes the template for  your wool pages.

Fold the wool in half. Place your template on the fold. Mark around your template. Cut with pinking shears or a pinking machine. (Note – With a pinking machine, you will loose a tiny bit of the size.)

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Place the fold along the inside crease of the flap and front piece. With the pages open, sew through the fold and crease.  I suggest a set of stitches in the center and at each end.

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Here is a set of needle pages in place:

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Cut 2 12″ sections of ribbon and set them aside for the handles.

Box pleat the remaining ribbon in small box pleats (about a half inch.) You will need the pleated ribbon to be flexible because it will need to go around the curves easily. (See how my box pleats like to flop below.) You can pleat enough to go around the front flap of your bag. You may have enough to go around the back as well. (The original does not have this.)

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Sew through the box pleats and the very edge of the flap. I like to catch the top center of each box pleat and the bottom center as well.

Here is the flap trimmed in box pleats.

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For the handles, fold under each end about a quarter of an inch. Pin in place at the very edge of the pasteboard center. Sew around three sides (sides and bottom) going through the lining and catching the decorative fabric hidden inside.

Repeat with both handles. (front to front and back to back seems to work better. Though some originals have handles going front to back.)

Here is my finished cotton work bag. (You will notice I opted for self fabric handles as I somehow ended up a bit short on my length of ribbon. I suspect I used a bit for another project and forgot.)

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Silk Bag

The silk bag has just a few remaining steps.

Remember this channel that was made when we attached the lining and silk? We are simply going to run a silk ribbon or cord through it.

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For each side, cut between 12″ and 18″ depending on how long you want your handles to be. (or cut one 24″ to 36″ long piece.)

Run the ribbon or cord from the inside where the bag meets the pasteboard, to the top of the bag’s channel and back to the base on the other side.

I prefer to work a small hole in the base of the lining to access the channel.

Also use a bodkin or stiletto to work a hole in the top of the silk. You may want to do a fine button hole stitch around this hole.

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I also use my bodkin to bring the ribbon/cord through the channel.

I anchor the ribbon/cord at the base of the channel. This could be done with a knot at each end or folding the end over and stitching down. Since I used a single ribbon, I tied one side and have a flat ribbon on the other side.

My finished version:

Published in: on February 7, 2016 at 6:00 am  Leave a Comment  
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Sew Along – Work Bag (week5)

This week we are lining the bag and attaching the flap to the front. (only the cotton bag gets the flap)

Cotton Work Bag

Fold your lining fabric, right sides together, to roughly the right size for your work bag. Place the work bag on top of the fabric with at least a half inch from the top of the pasteboard. Mark around the edge of the fabric leaving enough space for a seam allowance.

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Cut out along the line you marked. (In my case, notice that the livingroom scissors are now not suited for any fabric after the wrapping of gifts.)2016-01-06-16.31.03-1.jpg.jpeg

If you wish to add pockets to your lining, do so now on the right sides.

With the right sides together, sew the curved edge of the lining fabrics together. Some may wish to do two rows of stitching for strength.

 

Fold and press about 1/2″ of the straight edge of the lining to the outside.

 

Slide the lining inside the work bag (right side out).

 

Line the fold of the lining up so it is just below the edge of the outer fabric and pasteboard. (1-2mm) Pin as needed to keep everything lined up.

 

With a blind stitch or whip stitch, attach the lining to the outer fabric and pasteboard.

Finished with the lining.

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The front flap attaches simply with a whip stitch through the flap layers of fabric and the front panel of the bag. You are just going through the fabric, not through the pasteboard. (I find it easier to start in the middle, work to one side > back across > back to the middle.)

 

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Silk Work Bag

Fold your lining fabric, right sides together, to roughly the right size for your work bag. Place the work bag on top of the fabric about a half inch from the top. Mark around the bag on the fabric leaving enough space for a seam allowance.

Cut out along the line you marked.

Cut a slit in from the top about 2.5″

 

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If you wish to add pockets to your lining, do so now on the right sides.

With the right sides together, sew the curved edge of the lining fabrics together. Some may wish to do two rows of stitching for strength.

Slide the lining inside the work bag (right side out).

 

Line the fold of the lining up so it is just below the edge of the outer fabric and pasteboard. (1-2mm) Pin as needed to keep everything lined up.

With a blind stitch or whip stitch, attach the lining to the outer fabric and pasteboard.

***As you attach the lining, you are also creating a channel you will use later for the ribbon/cord to go through.

Finished with the lining.

Published in: on February 1, 2016 at 6:00 am  Comments (3)  
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Sew Along – Work Bag (week4)

This week we are attaching the balloony section we gauged last week to the covered paste board.

Cotton Work Bag

We are attaching the long section we gauged last week to two of the the covered pasteboards (the ones that are backed with the lining fabric.) The gauged fabric will be attached along the curved section of the pasteboard. The flat side will not have fabric attached.

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We will attach the pasteboard and the gauged fabric right sides together with the decorative side of the pasteboard, using a whip stitch. Line up the center point you marked on one side of the gauged fabric with the bottom center of the pasteboard. Pin these points together. Line up the quarter points with just above the curve on the pasteboard. (I’ll get a better photo of that.)

On each end, fold a quarter inch of the gauged fabric under. Line this fold up with the top of the pasteboard curve where it meets the flat side. Pin both ends as well.  (sorry, I will try to get a photo of this.)

Using a whip stitch, attach the folds of the gauging to the pasteboard. Go through both the decorative and lining fabrics, but not the paste board.

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When one side is finished, it will look something like this. You may need to coax the gauged fabric to lay flat aligned with the pasteboard. (outside and inside shots.) (Yes, I make use of the salvege.) 2015-12-29-18.00.36.jpg.jpeg 2015-12-29-18.01.08-1.jpg.jpeg

Repeat the pinning and whip stitching process with the second covered pasteboard.

When finished, you will have two sorta horse shoes attached to the gauged fabric. Take some time to play around with how these fit together. It is a rather nifty combination. 2015-12-29-18.32.24-1.jpg.jpeg 2015-12-29-18.32.30.jpg.jpeg 2015-12-29-18.33.02-1.jpg.jpeg 2015-12-29-18.33.13-1.jpg.jpeg

Lay the workbag out flat to check your stitches.  2015-12-29-18.33.49-1.jpg.jpeg

You have completed this week’s step. (You can turn it right side out if you want.)

 

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Silk Work Bag

 

We are attaching the long section we gauged last week to two of the the covered pasteboards (the ones that are backed with the lining fabric.) The gauged fabric will be attached around the entire circle on each side.

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We will attach the pasteboard and the gauged fabric right sides together with the decorative side of the pasteboard, using a whip stitch. Mark each circle in quarters. (pencil on the inside lining is fine.)

With the first pasteboard –  Fold a quarter inch under on each end. Line these  up with the top point on the pasteboard. Pin. Line center point of the gauged fabric up with the bottom point on the pasteboard and pin. Do the same with the side quarter points. (Sorry for the lack of photo.)

Using a whip stitch, attach the folds of the gauging to the pasteboard. Go through both the decorative and lining fabrics, but not the paste board.

2015-12-29-20.25.57.jpg.jpeg 2015-12-29-20.27.09.jpg.jpeg

When one side is finished, it will look something like this. You may need to coax the gauged fabric to lay flat aligned with the pasteboard.2015-12-29-22.03.08.jpg.jpeg

Repeat the pinning and whip stitch with the other pasteboard side.

When finished, check your work. Once you turn this one right side out, it will be be difficult to turn it inside out again.

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Published in: on January 24, 2016 at 6:00 am  Leave a Comment  
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2016 Sew Alongs

After test driving the Sew Alongs in two formats with making a Work Bag and a Pin Ball, I have decided to continue them through the year. I think a couple months for each will be a comfortable pace that will not overwhelm. (sorta like the fort-nightly challenges just spread out.)

 

This year’s Sew Alongs will include:

  • January thru March – a Work Bag and/or Pin Ball (in progress)
  • March thru May –  Purse (That which holds coin. This can include a miser’s style purse, an embroidered purse, a sewn purse, etc. The key is this is for holding coin.)
  • May thru July – Slippers (These slippers can be of needlework, braid work, knitted, quilted, etc.)
  • July thru Sept – Apron (of any type and purpose)
  • Sept thru November -TBD Head garment for the home or shop (This can include a cap, head wrap, etc.) or A “Carry In” (A type of bag or carrying device that could include a travel bag, pocket, etc.)

Sew Alongs are open to any historical era and skill level.

House Keeping: We will continue to use this blog and Facebook for sharing and support. For those not on Facebook or those who do not blog, please comment below and feel comfortable emailing me your project results so I can post them in the blog.

Please, share your progress as you work through your projects either in the comments section for that Sew Along or in the Facebook Group. Encourage each other as we work along. Remember, we are a mix of historical eras, skill levels and with different goals. (Yes, we have an assortment of site interpreters, reenactors and theatrical costumers.) The span of the Sew Along is a guideline, not a deadline. Continue to share your progress even after a new Sew Along has begun. Do not feel there is a firm deadline. We simply are going to encourage each other to work towards completion.

Upon completion of your project, which can be any time after the Sew Along starts, please share:

  • Photos of your completed project
  • The era of your project
  • Plans for its use (if any previously in mind)
  • Inspiration and/or documentation you particularly liked or found helpful
  • Your favorite part of the project
  • A self reflective accuracy rating (if this applies) (optional)
  • Total cost of project (optional)
Published in: on January 20, 2016 at 4:00 pm  Comments (8)  
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Sew Along – Work Bag (week3)

This week we are working on the balloony section of the bag.

For both the cotton and silk versions, cut and piece a 45″ long strip together — 6.5″ wide for the cotton — 4.5″ wide for the silk. This can be on the grain or on the bias. Press the piecing as needed.

Fold  and press 1/4″ to the wrong side along the length of both sides. Mark the center point and the quarter points with a thread or pin on each side.

Now, you get to practice gauging… well, sorta gauging since you really only need one thread. For my bag, I used a smaller stitch length on the front. This will help later when we attach to the paste board.

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***Do Not tie the thread to length yet. A knot at the end of the thread will be fine for now.***

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Here is one side drawn up to the half way mark:

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Here is the front side of the whole length drawn up. (approx 15″)

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The reverse:

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Silk Work Bag

 The process for the silk is the same as with the cotton. I didn’t take as many photos of the silk. (I got carried away with sewing.)

Before you begin, mark the half and quarter points on both long sides of the silk. (I marked mine with thread.)2015-12-29-19.47.15.jpg.jpeg 2015-12-29-19.48.32.jpg.jpeg 2015-12-29-20.16.03-1.jpg.jpeg

Published in: on January 17, 2016 at 6:00 am  Comments (1)  
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