Millinery (of the Late Winter) for the Spring of 1865

1

January

Fig 1 Opera hat of puffed white crape; each puff being separated by a row of large black beads; scarlet and black flowers, with loops of scarlet ribbon, replace the cape. The inside trimmings is of scarlet and black flowers and scarlet ribbon.(Godey’s Lady’s Book, January 1865)

2Fig 2 White evening bonnet, with falling crown, covered with lilies of the valley and daisies.(Godey’s Lady’s Book, January 1865)

3Fig 3 Opera bonnet of blue crape, trimmed with pink roses.(Godey’s Lady’s Book, January 1865)

1

February

1Fig 1 is one of the most novel bonnets that has been produced this season. The front is very narrow, and is composed of a row of pink satin boullions, behind which is a bandeau of black velvet, fluted at the top, and continued from the ears to form the strings; the front edge of the pink satin is trimmed with narrow black lace. There is really neither crown nor curtain, their place being supplied by two rows of broad black lace, the upper row falling a little over the under one at the top of which are a pink rose, and a bow and streamers of black velvet. The cap is trimmed with roses and bows of black velvet.(Godey’s Lady’s Book, February 1865)

2Fig 2 – Dress bonnet of Ponceau velvet spotted with small jet ornaments, the front edge is covered by a row of boullions of black thulle. The curtain is nothing but a flounce of black lace, headed by a grelot fringe, which fringe is continued on to the ears. At the back are loops and streamers of Ponceau velvet, and the strings are of the same. The cap is trimmed with fancy clowers of Ponceau velvet.(Godey’s Lady’s Book, February 1865)

3Fig 3 Bonnet composed of a foundation of white silk, covered with a close network of very narrow blue velvet. The curtain is of white lace, ornamented with loops of blue velvet, and having streamers of the same underneath. The crown is nearly covered by a broad brown and blue feather, and a plume of similar feathers is placed on the right side. The strings are of blue ribbon, and the trimmings in the cap are brown feathers and a few blue flowers.(Godey’s Lady’s Book, February 1865)

March

1 Fig 1 is a bonnet composed of narrow fullings of violet velvet; at the back, instead of a curtain, are two rows of black lace, set foot to foot with jet trimming between; at the left side an ornament of cock’s feathers and jet pendants; loops and long ends of velvet flowers and tufts of feathers; broad violet strings.(Godey’s Lady’s Book, March 1865)

2Fig 2 is a dress bonnet at the top front flutings of black velvet; the crown and sides of front folds of white satin in bias; over the crown fall two rows of black lace; bird of Paradise with long white feathers on the left side; no curtain; strings of broad white satin ribbon brought from the top of crown; blonde cap, with bows of velvet and rosebuds. (Godey’s Lady’s Book, March 1865)

3Fig 3 Bonnet of black velvet, the front covered plain. The crown is fulled and finished at the back by a bow and streamers of blue velvet ribbon; no curtain; folds of blue velvet cross the bonnet. (Godey’s Lady’s Book, March 1865)

4Fig 4 Black velvet bonnet. The folds in bias; a fall of black laca at the back instead of curtain; very large pink feather on the left side, edged with jet. (Godey’s Lady’s Book, March 1865)

5

Fig 5 White silk bonnet, with puffed front and falling crown, which is covered with long green crape leaves. A fall of blonde takes the place of a curtain. An illusion scarf is laid in folds over the bonnet, and ties under the chin. The inside trimming is of white and scarlet flowers. (Godey’s Lady’s Book, March 1865)

Published in: on February 3, 2015 at 4:35 pm  Leave a Comment  

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